Research article

Pensive professionalism: The role of 'required reflection' on a professional doctorate

Author
  • Bryan Cunningham

Abstract

This short paper examines the origins and nature of the reflective writing that is presently required on one part-taught doctorate in education (EdD) programme. It explores the various ways in which EdD candidates have engaged with self-reflection, using a number of extracts from writing submitted for formal assessments (including of the doctoral thesis itself, the culmination of their doctoral journey). The specific ways in which individuals have been caused to interrogate their place within, and contributions to, their respective professional realms are examined, as is the question of how writing in reflective vein has contributed to the evolution of professional identity. In the context of reflective writing, particular attention is paid to the ways in which the specific matter of developing confidence with accessing and manipulating language is frequently cited by individuals. As appropriate, connections are made in the paper between the above dimensions of what I am terming pensive professionalism and the perspectives of certain writers. The article concludes by drawing attention to the ways in which those of us involved in delivering professional doctorates need to be aware of, and induct our candidates into, the benefits of pensive professionalism.

Keywords: REFLECTIVE WRITING, PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY, PROFESSIONAL LEARNING, METALEARNING, LANGUAGE

How to Cite:

Cunningham, B., (2018) “Pensive professionalism: The role of 'required reflection' on a professional doctorate”, London Review of Education 16(1), 63–74. doi: https://doi.org/10.18546/LRE.16.1.07

754 Views

486 Downloads

1Citations

Published on
27 Mar 2018
Peer Reviewed
License